Jan
13

The coldest and hottest places in the World

Oymyakon, a village in Oymyakonsky Ulus of the Sakha Republic in Russia, is known as one of the candidates for the Northern Pole of Cold, because on January 26, 1926, a temperature of −71.2 °C (−96.2 °F) was recorded there (this fact is arguable because the temperature was not directly measured but obtained by extrapolation). However the lowest temperature recorded in 1892 in Verkhoyansk (Russia), was −69.8 °C (−93.6 °F). Temperatures in Verkhoyansk have spanned 101 °C (202 °F): from −68 °C (−90.4 °F) to 33 °C (91.4 °F). Together with Oymyakon it is one of the places considered the northern Pole of Cold.

Northern Poles of Cold: Oymyakon village and Verkhoyansk city in Russia

Northern Poles of Cold: Oymyakon village and Verkhoyansk city in Russia

Oymyakon (Russia) is coldest inhabited place on Earth

Oymyakon (Russia) is coldest inhabited place on Earth

According to the World Meteorlogical Organization, Bangkok, Thailand qualifies as the world’s hottest city. Some cities may get hotter during the day, but BKK doesn’t cool down much at night. Average Annual High is 32.7°C (90.0°F); Low is 24.1°C (73.4°F). Actually, Bangkok’s annual average temperature is 28°C (83°F). Gizan, Saudi Arabia tops the chart with an annual average of 30°C (86°F). The humidity of Bangkok makes it feel hotter than any other city. The average AM humidity is over 90% throughout the entire year and the average PM humidity is above 50%.

Bangkok, Thailand

Bangkok, Thailand

On September 13, 1922 a temperature of 57.7°C (135.9°F) was recorded in the city of Al ‘Aziziyah (El Azizia, located on the northern part of the Libya), the hottest recorded temperature ever on the surface of the Earth. Death Valley in California, USA, comes next. In Death Valley, temperature got up to 56°C (134°F) on July 10, 1913.

El Azizia city in Libya

El Azizia city in Libya

Death Valley in California, USA

Death Valley in California, USA

These records are based on the air temperature measurements done by weather stations scattered across the earth. But the actual temperature on the surface of the earth at that point of time could have been much higher. A NASA satellite recorded surface temperatures in the Lut desert of Iran as high as 71°C (159 °F), the hottest temperature ever recorded on the surface of the Earth.

Lut Desert (Iran) is hottest place on Earth

Lut Desert (Iran) is hottest place on Earth